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Low emission zone Copenhagen

Important!

Copenhagen has an environmental zone: Copenhagen

Name of the environmental zone: Environmental zone Copenhagen - Denmark

Date of entry into effect of the zone: 01-09-2008

Type of environmental zone: Permanent, 24 hours a day

Not allowed to drive (temporarily): Information currently unavailable

Not allowed to drive (permanently): The following vehicles are affected by the Danish environmental zones and require registration when entering:

Diesel vehicles: minibus (M2), coach (M3), van (N1), truck (N2), heavy truck (N3)

Small vans under 3.5 t must have at least an initial registration from 01.01.2007 (Euro 4).

Buses and trucks must have at least an initial registration from October 1st, 2009 (Euro 5).

Every vehicle from the above The date is automatically registered and the comparison is made with the vehicle central register in the respective country.

If a small van is approved before 2007 or a bus / truck before October 2009 and has a corresponding fine dust particle filter (PM), the registration must be carried out manually.

Fines: 1,700 €

Area/extension of the environmental zone: This environmental zone basically concerns the center of Copenhagen and the municipality of Frederiksberg. In order not to hinder the commercial traffic / ferry traffic from and to Copenhagen too much, a transit route from Nordhavnen leads through the environmental zone, which is however exempt from the obligation to register.

Contact of the environmental zone and exceptions: Information currently unavailable

Exemptions: Information currently unavailable

Good to know...

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