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Range test: petrol and public transport are significantly more expensive than diesel and electric

Which means of transport will get us the furthest for our money? A test shows why diesel vehicles are still so popular and that public transport is not an alternative for many people.

A study by the new car comparison platform Carwow in Berlin, Hamburg, Cologne and Munich shows which means of transport take us the furthest - for 5 euros. The test included a VW Golf 8 as a diesel and a petrol engine, as well as a VW ID.3 electric vehicle and the public transport services offered by major cities. It became clear why diesel vehicles are still so attractive: With a consumption of 3.7 l / 100 km, the diesel comes furthest, namely 129 kilometres. The e-car also scores very well, with a consumption of 13.4 kWh / 100 km and a range of 127 km, just behind the diesel car. The petrol car does considerably worse: for 5 euros, it only gets you 81 kilometres, with a consumption of 5 l / 100 km.

No wonder that many people still choose a diesel instead of a petrol car when buying a new car.

However, local public transport is dramatically far behind. On average, you can get only about 30 kilometres with 5 euros. As the 4 major German cities in the test have been struggling for years against excessive traffic on the roads as well as air quality and noise pollution caused by traffic, this shows the headlessness of the cities in their attempts to tackle the problem. In most cases, they resort to costly measures to reduce traffic, which are discontinued after some time because they are not effective. The fact that it would help to further promote and develop public transport and, above all, to make it more attractive in terms of price, does not seem to have occurred to city administrations.

Nevertheless a ray of hope: The test shows that the e-car can certainly already keep up. As the battery technology will probably be improved in the next few years, it could then become even more efficient and would thus be ahead in the 5-Euro comparison. It is to be hoped that there will not be any nasty surprises with purely electric cars, just as there are with hybrid vehicles, which show that the CO2 balance of the vehicles is much worse than the manufacturers claim (as reported last week).